KeyFob RKE Programming Procedure: Mitsubishi Lancer 1996-2001

Mitsubishi Lancer 1996-2001 KeyFob Remote Keyless Entry Programming Procedure

 

 

How to Program Mitsubishi Lancer KeyFob Remote Keyless Entry for the year 1996, 1999 and 2001.

 

Key Fob Programming Procedure (Remote)

 

Programming Procedure

Note. If the central locking / alarm system is malfunctioning or a replacement key fob is obtained. The following programming procedure is required to be carried out before the key fob will operate correctly. Maximum of 2 Remotes can be programmed.

 

  • Connect a link wire between Pin 4 and Pin 1 on the J1962 Connector
  • Close all Doors
  • Turn Ignition to ACC position and the back to Off 3 Times with in 10 Seconds
  • Doors Should lock then unlock
  • Press remote control lock or Unlock button once
  • Press remote control lock or Unlock button twice within 10 Seconds
  • Doors Should lock then unlock
  • Repeat for Second Remote

 

KeyFob RKE Programming Procedure: Mitsubishi Lancer 1996-2001

 

 

About Mitsubishi Lancer

In North America, the Lancer was introduced in 2001 for the 2002 model year as a direct replacement for the Mirage. In the United States, Chrysler had offered an unrelated Dodge Lancer at various stages between the 1950s and 1980s. However, when Daimler, who owned Chrysler at the time, briefly controlled Mitsubishi through the DaimlerChrysler-Mitsubishi alliance from 2000 through to 2004, the rights to the “Lancer” name were relinquished to Mitsubishi for usage in North America. Consequently, after Mitsubishi discontinued the 1995 series Mirage for North America in 2001, the replacement model adopted the Lancer name for the first time.

North American Lancers were powered by a 2.0-liter 4G94 engine producing 120 hp (89 kW) and 130 lb⋅ft (176 N⋅m) of torque. In Mexico, the Lancer sedan was available in DE, ES, LS and GS trims with a 2.0-liter DOHC 4G63 engine.

In addition to the facelift, North America received three additional models to the Lancer line in 2004—Lancer Ralliart, LS Sportback and Ralliart Sportback. Ralliart slots in between the base models and high-performance Evolution. These cars came equipped with Mitsubishi’s 2.4-liter 4G69 engine (rated at 160 hp (119 kW)/ 162 lb⋅ft (220 N⋅m) for the Sportback, and 162 hp (121 kW)/ 162 lb⋅ft (220 N⋅m) for the Ralliart). The power gain was due to a tuned muffler for the Ralliart, and also included a new, stiffer suspension package that improved handling and lowered for Ralliart and lifted the LS Sportback by 2.9 inches. The LS Sportback had 15-inch steel or optional 15-inch alloy wheels. The Ralliart came with 16-inch alloy wheels, front bucket seats borrowed from Japan’s Mitsubishi Evolution GT-A, optional fog lamps, and a new aerodynamic ground package for Ralliart. The LS Sportback and Ralliart Sportback were equipped with a four-speed INVECS-II automatic transmission, while the Ralliart came with a five-speed manual transmission with an option for the four-speed automatic.

For the 2005 model year, the grille was changed to include more fins to reflect a closer similarity to the North American Galant. For the 2006 model year, the fascia was changed again from a bridged fascia to one with an open vent after Mitsubishi received complaints from current owners regarding its similarity in appearance to General Motors Division Pontiac’s corporate look, and to bring the appearance closer to its bigger brother, the Evolution. (Source Wiki)

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *