KeyFob RKE Programming Procedure: Acura CL 1997-2003

KeyFob RKE Programming Procedure: Acura CL 1997-2003

Acura CL 1997-2003 KeyFob Remote Keyless Entry Programming Procedure

How to Program Acura CL KeyFob Remote Keyless Entry for the year 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003.

 

Step by Step How to Programming Instructions:

1. Turn the ignition switch on (II on the ignition)

2. W/in 1-4 seconds, push the transmitter lock or unlock button with the transmitter aimed at the keyless receiver unit. (Just at the steering wheel is fine)

3. W/in 1-4 seconds, turn the ignition switch off

4. W/in 1-4 seconds, turn the ignition switch on(II)

5. W/in 1-4, push the transmitter lock or unlock button w/ the transmitter aimed at the receiver again.

6. W/in 1-4 seconds, turn the ignition switch off

7. W/in 4 seconds, turn the ignition switch On(II)

8. w/in 1-4 seconds, push the transmitter lock or unlock again.

9. w/in 4 sec, turn the ignition off

10. w/in 4 sec, turn the ignition ON

11. W/in 1-4, push the transmitter again

12. Confirm you can hear the sound of the door actuators. W/in 1-4 seconds, push the trans lock or unlock button again.

13. W/in 10 seconds, aim the transmitters (up to three) whose codes you want to store at the receiver, and press the transmitter lock or unlock buttons. Confirm that you can hear the sound of the door lock actuators after each transmitter code is stored.

14. Turn the ignition switch off, and pull out the key.

15. Confirm proper operation with the new codes.

About Acura CL

For the 1999 model year, the Acura CL’s sibling, the TL, was redesigned. The CL, however, was never produced as a 2000 model and instead in March 2000 the completely redesigned Acura CL was released as a 2001 model featuring a 3.2 L SOHC VTEC J-series V6. A navigation system was also available along with the Type-S model, denoting Acura’s ‘Sport’ edition. While the regular CL featured a 225 hp (168 kW) V6, the Type-S boasted a 260 hp (194 kW) V6 with 17-inch wheels, a firmer suspension, slightly larger brakes, and firmer seats. At the time, the Type-S was the most powerful front wheel drive vehicle Honda had ever manufactured.

In 2002, the CL Type-S was offered, as a 2003 model, with a close-ratio 6-speed manual transmission with a helical limited-slip differential. The 6-speed CL deleted some minor interior features from the automatic, such as a center console light. Also, the heated seats only featured one heat setting (vs. high and low in the auto). VSA and TCS were also not found on the 6-speed car, and as such, a 3-channel ABS unit was used.

One of the main criticisms of the CL was that a manual transmission had been dropped when the car was redesigned for the 2001 model year. Very few manual transmission models were built; there were 2,691 without navigation and 820 with navigation, for a total of 3,511. Despite such small numbers of manual transmissions, there was still a greater demand than Acura had expected.

The 6-speed car was highly praised by critics, with one calling it “the high point of Acura performance outside the NSX and Integra Type-R”. However, with the CL’s sister car, the TL, coming up on a redesign for the 2004 model year, the CL was dropped from Acura’s lineup and to this day Acura has no mid-size luxury coupe replacement. Total Acura CL sales from 2000 until 2003, when the last new model was sold, was less than 31,000 units. The CL’s manual transmission survives in the 3rd generation TL and 7th generation Honda Accord. (Source Wiki)

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