Key Programming: Saturn Outlook 2007-2010

Key Programming Saturn Outlook 2007-2010

Saturn Outlook 2007-2010 Key Programming Procedure

 

The following are the key programming procedures for the 2007 and 2010 Saturn Outlook.

 

ADD DUPLICATE KEY (Requires at least one working key):

1. Verify that the new key has “PK3” or “+” stamped on it.

2. Insert the original, already programmed key into the ignition lock cylinder and start the engine. If the engine will not start, see your dealer for service.

3. After the engine has started, turn the key to LOCK/OFF and remove the key.

4. Insert the key to be programmed and turn it to ON/RUN within 10 seconds of removing the previous key. The security light will turn off once the key has been programmed. It may not be apparent that the security light went on due to how quickly the key is programmed. (If your vehicle does not have a security light (04-07 Grand Prix, Bonneville, Impala), wait 10 minutes 45 seconds to make sure the key has been programmed).

5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 if additional keys are to be programmed.

 

 

About Saturn Outlook

The Saturn Outlook is a full-size crossover SUV that debuted at the New York International Auto Show. It was built on the same GM Lambda platform as the Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, and GMC Acadia. In 2006, the Outlook was released as a 2007 model. The Outlook was the cheapest of GM’s Lambda crossover SUVs, costing less than the GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave. Following the introduction of the Chevrolet Traverse for the 2009 model year and the demise of the Outlook, along with the rest of the Saturn brand, in 2010, with the 2010 model year being the final model year for the Outlook, the Chevrolet Traverse would eventually take the place of the Outlook as the family-oriented model. After the 2010 model year, the Saturn Outlook was phased out.

The Outlook was constructed in the Delta Township Assembly factory in Lansing, Michigan, along with the other Lambda-based vehicles. The Saturn Outlook and its twin, the GMC Acadia, commenced production for the 2007 model year on May 24, 2006.

All manufacturing and sales of the Outlook (and the GMC Acadia) were briefly halted in December 2006 due to an issue with potentially faulty rivets in the cargo floor slightly forward of the rear hatch, as well as an issue with the engine mounts not having holes drilled to drain accumulated water. The assembly method was rapidly tweaked, and dealerships were instructed to rectify the issues before reselling the Outlook (or the Acadia). Within days of the announcement, sales resumed.

In a three-row configuration, the Outlook can accommodate eight people. Two bucket seats are available in the front row, while the second row can be configured as a 60/40 split-folding three-passenger bench seat or two individual “captain chairs.” A 60/40 split-folding three-passenger bench seat is located in the third row.

GM touted the “industry first” SmartSlide second row in the press statement announcing the Outlook’s introduction. The seat cushion flips forward when the seat is slid forward in both bench and captain chairs, allowing for “compression” of the area used by the seat in the forward position. When the third seat is folded down, the cargo room can be expanded. The technology also allows for fore-and-aft adjustability of the middle seat, allowing for greater legroom between the second and third rows.

In late 2009, production of the Outlook was terminated. However, in February 2010, GM restarted manufacture of the Outlook in order to utilize up remaining parts before the Saturn business was shut down. It’s unclear how or where they were purchased. There were 3,637 2010 model year Outlooks constructed, with 2,507 of them assembled within the calendar year 2010.

The bodyshell of the Outlook was reborn as a mid-cycle upgrade of the 2013 GMC Acadia after it was discontinued. The bodyshell of the 2013 Acadia was mostly identical from that of the Saturn Outlook, with GM only making alterations where necessary.

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